Dan Hume's Blog


Layered Images
April 1, 2012, 3:33 pm
Filed under: Extended Major Project, Photography, Photoshop

I wasn’t too convinced by having a series of photos that the user can swipe through. It doesn’t come across very interesting or unique so I’ve been trying to work out how I could merge the sequence into one still image. Then it occurred to me that I should try and layer the images onto of each other in chronological order and play around the with opacity settings to bring through all the positions of the people in each different shot.

This image, called Violent Women, was created by Duane Michals as well. This gave me the idea of taking a photographic sequence and compiling it into one image, which allows you to see the different movements and positions of the subject. Back when Michals did this technique, it would haven a bit more technical for it to work accordingly. It’s obvious from the photo that Michals used a tripod to capture each different shot. Having the camera stabilised into one position makes it easier to compile the other photographs of the subject moving from one end of the shot to the other.

When I did this with all the eight images, it looked incredibly messy and too confusing to look at so I selected only three images instead. Combining three mages together that have been taken at the same location, but at different times really conveys the concept of generating a small narrative within a still image.

Unlike Michals example, I shot these images handheld instead of a tripod. This is why they’re quite blurry as not all the images match up exactly because I’m making slight movements each time I take a photo. I think if I spent more time in Photoshop I could perfect a bit more, but if I had shot the photos whilst using a tripod, they would match much better.

Update!

I’ve just come up with another idea for how this sequence could be viewed instead of a still image. I decided it would be cool to turn the sequence into a video to show it developing into a series of different shots merging together. This way I could also record some sound of that particular location and adapt it to the scene to make it more dynamic. I think this would make the idea behind this technique much clearer by showing the image develop.

As I’m focusing on technology disconnecting people from their surroundings, I decided that it would look better if I separated the man listening to his mp3 player from the other people in the scene.

I could have easily have just video recorded this to capture the same little narrative. However, there’s something quite unique about watching the images transform from the beginning to the end.

Advertisements

Leave a Comment so far
Leave a comment



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: